CARES IS ALWAYS OPEN! If you are having a pet emergency please call or visit. 215-750-2774 Directions

Emergency Care

Our hospital is staffed with two board certified critical care specialists, a team of dedicated full time emergency clinicians, and experienced technicians led by emergency and critical care specialty certified experts. We are the front line of the hospital and treat companion animals for nearly any illness or condition, including gastrointestinal upset, seizures, heart failure, poisonings, trauma, and surgical conditions.

Visit or call us immediately in any of the following emergency situations:

PETS WHO GET HIT BY CARS

Any animal that is hit by a car should be carefully examined by a veterinarian due to the possibility of internal injuries. If the pet is
conscious, be warned that the animal might be in pain and try to bite.

HEAT STROKE

Heat stroke can be fatal. A pet left out in the sun, exercised in hot weather, locked in a car, or left in a hot home without air conditioning may quickly develop heat stroke. Signs of heat stroke include loud panting, bright red gums, or a staring expression. If possible, bring your pet’s temperature down by soaking them with cold water and covering them with cold wet towels before rushing them to the hospital.

CONVULSIONS / SEIZURES

Any pet convulsing for the first time or for more than 3 minutes or having multiple seizures should be seen immediately. Be sure to keep your hands out of the pet’s mouth, they will not swallow their tongue.

POISONING OR TOXICITY

Toxins that pets are most likely to consume include rat poison, medications, snail bait, insecticides, antifreeze, and certain poisonous plants. If possible, bring the packaging the toxin came in or know the exact name of the toxin and when it was ingested.

DIFFICULTY GIVING BIRTH

Difficulties giving birth include straining to have a puppy or kitten for more than an hour, crying, or acting painful, red or green tinged vaginal discharge that persists for more than 12 hours after delivery, or if the mother is vomiting, weak, or trembling.

ALLERGIC REACTION

Pets can have a reaction to bee stings, carpet cleaners, lawn chemicals, or vaccines. Indications of an allergic reaction include difficulty breathing, facial swelling, hives, vomiting and diarrhea.

BLOAT

Bloat is a life threatening condition that involves a swelling of thstomach with gas, fluid, and/or food. Signs of bloat include excessive salivation, extreme restlessness, attempts to vomit with production of thick foam like saliva, abdominal pain and distention.

CATS STRAINING TO URINATE

Obstruction of the urinary tract is a life threatening condition caused by the formation of crystals or stones in the bladder. Signs of an obstruction include urination in places other than the litter box, increased licking of the genital area, straining to urinate, frequent attempts to urinate, crying, or blood in the urine.

INABILITY TO WALK

Any pet that is having difficulty walking should be evaluated by a veterinarian. In many cases, the inability to walk may be due to spinal problems such as an acute disk rupture. Other possibilities include tumors, trauma, and degenerative diseases. Additionally, there may be a systemic medical problem that is causing generalized weakness.

OTHER INDICATIONS OF A PET EMERGENCY SITUATION MAY INCLUDE:

  • Difficulty breathing or changes in breathing
  • Vomiting or diarrhea
  • Wounds, bleeding or bruising
  • Pale or gray gums
  • Eye problems
  • Anything that is concerning to you

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